About Us

The Ephemera Society of America, Inc. is a non-profit organization formed in 1980 to cultivate and encourage interest in ephemera and the history identified with it; to further the understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of ephemera by people of all ages, backgrounds, and levels of interest; to promote the personal and institutional collection, preservation, exhibition, and research of ephemeral materials; to serve as a link among collectors, dealers, institutions, and scholars; and to contribute to the cultural life of those who have an interest in our heritage as a nation or a people, both nationally and internationally.

The Society sponsors an annual convention that includes seminars, exhibitions, a superb ephemera show and sale, workshops, collector forums, and other conference events.

The Society's Web site — www.ephemerasociety.org — connects with thousands of visitors seeking information about ephemera, provides contacts with other collectors and ephemera-related businesses, and includes notices of Society events.

All members-—individuals, libraries, corporations, colleges, historical societies, and museums—receive The Ephemera Journal, a 32-page four color publication published three times a year; an annual Membership Directory; the eNews, and special admission to Society-sponsored functions.

Members also enjoy the camaraderie and shared interests of fellow ephemerists.

Mission Statement

Mission of the Society and its Members

  • - To cultivate and encourage interest in ephemera and the history identified with it
  • - To further the understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of ephemera by people of all ages, backgrounds, and levels of interest
  • - To promote the personal and institutional collection, preservation, exhibition, and research of ephemeral materials
  • - To serve as a link among collectors, dealers, institutions, and scholars
  • - To contribute to the cultural life of those who have an interest in our heritage as a nation or a people, both nationally and internationally

Commitment of the Society and its Board
  • - To conduct the affairs of the Ephemera Society according to the highest professional and ethical standards
  • - To strive to be recognized for excellence
  • - To value and develop our membership
  • - To manage our finances prudently
  • Media Relations

    The Ephemera Society of America is a non-profit organization linking collectors, dealers, scholars, museum curators, publishers and others.

    To arrange an interview with one of our experts, please contact:

    Diane DeBlois
    Media Relations Director
    The Ephemera Society of America

    (315) 655-9139

    diane@ephemerasociety.org

  • Post
    Pop-ups from Prague A Centennial Celebration of the Graphic Artistry of Vojtech Kubašta (1914-1992) From the Collection of Ellen G. K. Rubin Pop go the pop-up books in a lively public exhibition at the Grolier Club drawn from the collection of Ellen G. K. Rubin. On view from January 23 thorough March 15, 2014 in the second floor Members’ Gallery, the exhibition showcases the full range of artwork by the major Czech paper engineer, children’s book illustrator, and graphic designer Vojtech Kubašta (1914-1992).
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  • Post
    Selling the Dwelling: The Books That Built America’s Houses, 1775-2000 Through Friday February 7, 2014 in our Ground Floor Gallery:"Selling the Dwelling: The Books That Built America’s Houses, 1775-2000." An exhibit by Ephemera Society member, Richard Cheek. The evolution of the house design book in the United States is a long and complicated story, filled with architectural creativity and banality, commercial genius and excess, egalitarian and humanitarian ideals, literary and social ambition, can-do individualism, faith in progress and invention, and endless energy.
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  • Post
    Civil War “Dog Tags”: Sutlers Solve the ID Dilemma During the American Civil War, soldiers were concerned that their bodies would not be identified in the aftermath of a battle because neither the Union nor Confederate government issued identification tags, commonly called "dog tags" today. Consequently, many soldiers would write their name on a piece of paper and pin it to their clothing or scratch their name into the soft lead of their belt buckle.
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