A Measure of Friendship: Calling Cards

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July 21, 2017 Sarah Ashlock

by Sarah Ashlock

Before Days of Elegance closed up shop a couple years ago, they published a thorough exploration of calling cards. In honor of International Friendship Day––July 30––let's reminisce on what friendship used to look like.

"In the day of genteel manners and formal introductions, the exchange of calling cards was a social custom that was essential in developing friendships. The custom of carrying calling or visiting cards began in France in the early 1800's.  It quickly spread throughout Europe, and then became vastly popular in the United States, especially the New England area from 1840-1900.  Calling cards were carried primarily by the well-to-do ladies who made a point to go calling on friends and family on a specified day of the week or month, depending on their location and proximity to neighbors. The gracious reserve of a simple calling card is a gentle reminder of one's presence, and the care poured into a finely crafted card is a welcome courtesy."

calling-card-3-friendship

"A wonderful example of a fringed fan hidden name calling card - bearer's name under bird scrap"

calling-card-1-friendship

"This inventive card has a gelatine window through which you can see a couple and is a hidden name card"

 

calling-card-2-friendship

"A wonderful example of a fringed fan hidden name calling card - bearer's name under bird scrap"

 

Read the full post here.


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